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Language Screening

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Language Screening

Postby lisasang » Tue Jul 13, 2004 6:05 pm

I am an itinerant SLP in the public schools. I work with students preschool-12th grade and as a recent grad have unnecessarily completed full assessments on students referred to me because I did not have a langauge-screening tool to use. Does anyone have any suggestions on commercially available or self-made screenings for language and auditory processing?
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Language Screening

Postby dana3 » Wed Jul 14, 2004 4:22 pm

I have used the CELF 3 screening. They now have a CELF 4 but I am not familiar it. Good luck.
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Language Screening

Postby illuminating » Fri Jul 16, 2004 9:30 am

I use the OWLs as a screening tool since it spans such a large age range and it gives me direction for further diagnostic assessment via the
CASL.
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Language Screening

Postby Ingrid » Mon Jul 26, 2004 8:21 pm

I just saw in a catalog that the CELF-4 language screening will be coming out soon. I would order it as soon as you can.
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Language Screening

Postby Ingrid » Mon Jul 26, 2004 8:26 pm

I would also try to find a different screener for the preschoolers. When I worked in schools they were the ones that I got the most initial referrals for, and often it was an inappropriate referrral because the parents and/or teachers didn't realize what was normal for that age range. I have used the Joliet 3 minute screener (hated it-not enough info) and the Fluharty-2 (hated it-too much info, took too long to give). The Spanish speaking SLP in our distirct used the language screener from the DIAL-3, but when I looked at the English version of it I wasn't very impressed. I have looked at the KLST-2 and was considering using it before I left the schools. I work for an early childhood intervention program now. Let me know if you find a great preschool speech and language screener.
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Language Screening

Postby ValarieC » Thu Jul 29, 2004 1:29 am

There seems to be a step missing in your referral process. Before a student is recommended for testing, in our district they go thru a pre-referral process where a team of regular ed and special ed staff do classroom interventions for a period of at least 6 weeks. Then the team will decide what testing will be done if progress is not noted. This process has cut down on the number of inappropriate referrals SLP's do. We also can put on the permission to test form, IF NEEDED next to speech-language testing. As far as a screener for pre-k we use the Fluharty and we like most of the subtests-we don't always give all of them depending on the referral concerns.
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Language Screening

Postby janel2 » Tue Sep 21, 2004 7:27 pm

For ages 3 to 6:11 the Flueharty, KLST, Bankston, and Speech Ease all have pros & cons but using a comb of them you can screen all areas requires: expressive, receptive, artic, fluency, phonological awareness.
My problem is kids over 6:11. There is no test that screen all areas. I've considered using the OWLS since it does not give enough info to plan therapy, but don't know if technically/legally its a "test" or a "screen". The CELF is horrible for kids over 8 and does not cover all areas we are required to screen.
If someone comes up with a high quality comprehensive screen they will be rich!
Janel
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Language Screening

Postby hannahdg » Thu Sep 23, 2004 10:42 pm

The OWLS is a language test instrument, not a screening instrument.
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Language Screening

Postby rcolomaio » Tue Oct 05, 2004 12:40 pm

It is funny that this topic came up..just yesterday I spent about a whole prep period searching the various web sites, looking and hoping for something to use for screening. I too have 4th-12th graders to screen. I found an old "Communication Screening" from the early 1980's. It is no longer published, of course, but it had an auditory, vocabulary, and artic. sections, only for 4-6 year olds. I changed the format on it, adding auditory-perceptual (word, number, sentence memory), 10 vocabulary words from 8 yrs. +, both definitions and synonyms. The words I used for the memory are also my artic. screening. I also listen for sentence length, intelligibility and fluency. It is better than nothing....
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Language Screening

Postby dawnslp3 » Thu Oct 07, 2004 6:10 am

We decided to change screenings this year b/c the Fluharty has not been a valid predictor of a language delay where I work. We used the KLST-2 and the Fluharty-2. Unfortunately, the KLST-2 was worse than the original Fluharty. I had so many kids fail it and then receive scores over 100 on the language evaluation! I'm not sure about the predictability with the Fluharty-2 b/c most of the kids tested with it only needed articulation/phonology. In other words, all the kids passed the language screening part. That could be good or bad, depending on if it missed the ones that do have a language delay. We are going to try out some new screening tests come January. One is from AGS-Early Screeing Profiles that our PK Teachers are required to do. Anyone ever use that? I would love to hear feedback. Our state consultant for Speech recommended the DIAL. Any feedback on that?

I figure if I'm going to take the time to give a screening, I want it to be as reliable as possible. I know I cannot account for everything, but I think the results we have been getting are ridiculous, to say the least. By the way, we do perform mass K-screenings at the beginning of every school year. Next year we are going to wait until after the first 6 weeks and see if it helps with reliability/predictability.
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Language Screening

Postby songspinner » Thu Oct 14, 2004 12:24 pm

This is such a great topic. Thanks, everybody. I've used the Fluharty myself, but using that in mass screenings is a nightmare. The DIAL-3 isn't enough information for me, even though it gives more info across domains that helps me at the early stages. For the mass-screens, I've resorted to doing my own version as well.

I agree about the pre-referral process being a very helpful and necessary step to help keep us from assessment overload (ha!) although in our state (WA), each district certainly has their own procedure for that.

To our new young friend....welcome to the field! Try to keep your head up and don't feel bad....it's a really difficult job.
Stay healthy!
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Language Screening

Postby sp1 » Thu Oct 14, 2004 3:15 pm

I use only an informal screener that I devised. It asks for a student to say his/her name, then count to 10, then identify basic colors then identify shapes. I know - those tasks should be completed successfully by kindergartners or 1st graders. But older children as well as younger ones do the next two tasks. The first task is to describe pictures using complete sentences. The second task is parts of the sentence memory test taken from the Woodcock Johnson Cognitive tests. This is the best memory test I have ever seen in my several years in this field. It's good through high school. I can measure auditory memory and get an idea of grammatical usage at the same time. The other thing to look at is past tense usage, both regular and irregular past tense. I think past tense, more than any other single task, really defines whether a student has a grasp of basic expressive language skills. Copy a page from the SPARC book on irregular past tense, or use several other materials out there to give you pictures to describe. And you can listen for artic, stuttering, and voice problems as you screen. Why use standardized tools for screenings when you can use an informal measure that is faster? I'd save standardized testing for ... testing.
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Language Screening

Postby dawnslp3 » Thu Oct 14, 2004 4:42 pm

Most of what you said sounds great, but where I work, we do not focus on grammar (irregular tenses etc.) b/c they are part of dialect here and are considered a difference, not a disorder. [img]images/smiles/icon_razz.gif[/img]
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Language Screening

Postby Doug » Thu Oct 14, 2004 11:43 pm

For preschool referrals, I work closely with our developmental preschool teacher. Together we interview parents using the Battelle Developmental Inventory Sceening Instrument.
While we do this the child is playing in the preschool classrooma and we are oberving him/her. This gives the child a chance to explore and become familiar with us and the surroundings. We then do the rest of the screener with the child and I do a quick artic screening (Goldman-Fristoe). By then we have a pretty good idea if this chld has major issues or even borderline issues that need an indepth assessment. I very much enjoy working as a team with the other professionals in our program.

For students in the upper grades, I look at the student's classroom performance as the first screening. If the teacher reports that the student is having problems in language areas (reading, written language, oral language)and is academically in trouble, the student is assessed comprehensively for the presence of information processing deficits by our special education team. This includes the school psychologist and educational assessor as well as myself. School is a language-based environment. Students with language problems will show up as kids with reading and writing disorders. If they are not having academic problems, they do not have a language delay severe enough to worry about. I used to work with groups of "language delayed" students who were not getting any other support in reading or written language. I no longer do this. (The only exception is the student with a specific expressive oral language disorder. This student has no academic problems, but has great difficulty with oral syntax/morphology).

I guess my point is, school based SLP's need to be part of a team. When I first started practicing twenty-seven years ago, we worked alone. Those were the dark ages.
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Language Screening

Postby acnaib » Fri Aug 28, 2009 8:38 am

I am having similar problems finding screening tools that will rule one way or other. Any one used Joliet 3 minute screen, SOLST or fluharty2.
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